Reading 9: Man's Best Freind - Dog Fables:

Bernard Salomon: Aesop (1547) Fable 44. Dog & The Butcher.

Salomon1547

 Les Fables d'Esope Phrygien, mises en Ryme Francoise, with illustrations by Bernard Salomon. 1547. The images, but not the text, are available online at the Studiolo website.

Selected Dog Fables

Perry Index Fable Name Aesopica Versions Reading Selection
Perry 92 The House Dog and the Hunting Dog Chambry 175 version 1 #9 Primary (1)
Perry 92 The House Dog and the Hunting Dog Chambry 175 version 2 #9 Primary (2)
Perry 330 The Dog and His Master Babrius 110 #9 Optional
Perry 254 The Dog and the Butcher Syntipas 33 #9 Advanced


Things Dogs Do...

Aristophanes Wasps - In defense of a dog...
BDELYCLEON He is a good dog, and he chases wolves finely.
PHILOCLEON He is a thief and a conspirator.
BDELYCLEON No, he is the best of all our dogs; he is capable of guarding a whole flock.
PHILOCLEON And what good is that, if he eats the cheese?
BDELYCLEON What? he fights for you, he guards your door; he is an excellent dog in every respect. Forgive him his larceny! he is wretchedly ignorant, he cannot play the lyre.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Τί κοινὸν κυνὶ καὶ βαλανείῳ;

Dog Fables make up about 50 of the 600 Aesopic fables. Dogs then as now are a part of civilized life. We see all aspects of dog behavior....despicable (sniffing each other's butts) , annoying (barking), embarassing , disrespectful (peeing on anything in sight), and angry (biting). They are smart enough to know when a good thing is up (a master slaughters his ox and donkey - who do you think is next?) and when not to accept gifts (from the dog-catcher). They are the sworn enemies of the wolves. They take advantage of the moment (grabbing a piece of meat). They like to play and have fun i.e. 'party' (cf. The Dog and the Cook - Has anyone read Dr. Zeus' book Go-Dog-Go? Where were the dogs all going?). They can negotiate themselves out of tough spots. There are both stupid dogs and smart dogs. They eat anything and everything in sight(an egg, a crab; thinking comes second when it means another might get its food). Athenians even allow them as witnesses in court (cf. Aristophanes Wasps below to read a doggy-indictment!).

About the Fables

The House Dog and Hunting Dog is a fable not unlike the story of Cain and Able in the Bible. Two 'brothers' have a dispute, one is a hunter, the other a domesticated 'house dog'. The hunter is upset with the other because he does not do any work. The house dog has an excuse, 'Hey, don't blame me....' Chambry give us two very similar anonymous versions. The questions for both versions are together. There is also a side-by-side line-by-line presentation of the two fables for easy reference. "A similar story is associated with the legendary Spartan lawgiver Lycurgus (in Plutarch, Sayings of the Spartans): Lycurgus took two dogs and raised them differently, one as a hunter and one as a house dog, in order to demonstrate the degree to which education determines excellence." (From Aesop's Fables, A New Translation by Laura Gibbs, Oxford World Classics, 2002)

The Dog and His Master is a 'dog joke.' Even my children 'got it.' Why not blame the dog? Babrius gives us the four lines of verse in which we get a little of 'dog lingo.' If you have yet to translate Babrius, try this short saying.


The Dog and the Butcher is an anonymous fable translated by Syntipas. (Syntipas translated fables back into Greek from Syriac in the eleventh Century A.D.) This fable contains a play on the word 'heart' καρδία. "In Greek, the 'heart' was considered a seat of intelligence (something like our 'brains'), whereas we commonly associate the heart with feelings and emotions. Instead of losing heart (= losing his wits), the butcher has taken heart (= wised up)" (From Aesop's Fables, A New Translation by Laura Gibbs, Oxford World Classics, 2002).


What's your favorite dog fable?

My favorite dog fable is The Dog and the Statue of Hermes. There are about 60 references to dogs in the list below (both of Latin and Greek fables). Dogs can be found in innumerable fables; the Aesopica content list for 'dog' is as follows:

...dog and bell 212
... and blacksmiths 380
... and butcher 598
... and collar 3
... and cook 382
... and crocodile 102
... and crow 320
... and donkey 400
... and fox 228, 373
... and general of army 60
... and hides 442
... and lamb 381
... and lion skin 231
... and master 338, 388, 502
... and master departing 393
... and master in winter 292
... and Orpheus 503
... and peace with wolves 30
... and puppies 116
... and reeds 566
... and reflection 263
... and rooster 149
... and sheep 133, 498
... and sheep in court 174, 175
... and shellfish 430
... and sow litters 196
... and statue of Hermes 564
... and treasure 405

... and wolf 3, 60, 117
... and Zeus 569
... chases hare
396
... chases lion 228
... chases wolf 232
... flees circus 409
... in manger 163
... in well 77
... in winter and summer 267
... insults sow 197
... kisses hare 374
... rebukes sheep 67
... refuses dog catcher 88
... resents house-dog 68
... sheep and shepherd 67
... sheep and wolf 32, 174
... shepherd about wolf 39
dog-bite 77, 173, 212
dog-catcher 88
dog-house 116, 163, 267

Indexes from the Mythfolklore.net Aesopica website by Laura Gibbs

Pictures

Pictures are wanting for these dog fables, with the exception of Bernard Salomon: Aesop (1547) Fable 44. Dog & The Butcher. and Steinhowel 122 (shown below - I'm still searching). The best way to view pictures of dogs in the fable books is to use the Aesopica fable index for each book edition (given below). I use the Firefox (web browser) and select 'SEARCH FOR' and then check 'HIGHLIGHT ALL'. You just have to know the word for dog in Latin (but remember to use the various cases: cane, canis, canibus, etc. or just use 'can') and French (chien, chiens, etc. or just use 'chien') to search in the old editions.

Illustrated Editions
Steinhowel (1479)
Steinhowel (1501)
Steinhowel (1521)
Osius (1574)
Salomon (1574)
Francis Barlow (1687)
Thomas Bewick (1818)
Townsend - Weir (1867)
Griset-Tenniel-Weir
(1884)
Walter Crane (1887)
Jacobs-Heighway (1894)
Jones-Rackham (1912)
Milo Winter (1919)

 


Texts and Questions

Reading 9 - Primary Reading (1) Chambry 175 Version 1
Apparatus
Translation
Answers
Vocabulary

.

Κύνες δύο.

[1] Ἔχων τις δύο κύνας, τὸν μὲν θηρεύειν ἐδίδασκε, τὸν δὲ οἰκουρὸν ἐποίησε. [2] Καὶ δή, εἴ ποτε ὁ θηρευτὴς ἐξιὼν ἐπ' ἄγραν συνελάμβανέ τι, ἐκ τούτου μέρος καὶ τῷ ἑτέρῳ παρέβαλλεν. [3] Ἀγανακτοῦντος δὲ τοῦ θηρευτικοῦ καὶ τὸν ἕτερον ὀνειδίζοντος, εἴ γε αὐτὸς μὲν ἐξιὼν παρ' ἕκαστα μοχθεῖ, ὁ δὲ οὐδὲν ποιῶν τοῖς αὐτοῦ πόνοις ἐντρυφᾷ, [4] ἐκεῖνος ἔφη πρὸς αὐτόν· "Ἀλλὰ μὴ ἐμὲ μέμφου, ἀλλὰ τὸν δεσπότην, ὃς οὐ πονεῖν με ἐδίδαξεν, ἀλλοτρίους δὲ πόνους κατεσθίειν." [E] Οὕτω καὶ τῶν παίδων οἱ ῥᾴθυμοι οὐ μεμπτέσι εἰσίν, ὅταν αὐτοὺς οἱ γονεῖς οὕτως ἄγωσιν.

 

Reading 9 - Primary Reading (2) Chambry 175 version 2
Notes
Apparatus
Translation
Answers
Vocabulary

Chambry 175 version 2 text

Κύνες δύο.

[1] Ἔχων τις δύο κύνας, τὸν μὲν ἕτερον θηρεύειν ἐδίδαξε, τὸν δὲ λοιπὸν οἰκοφυλακεῖν. [2] Καὶ δή, εἴ ποτε ὁ θηρευτικὸς ἤγρευέ τι, καὶ ὁ οἰκουρὸς συμμετεῖχεν αὐτῷ τῆς θοίνης. [3] Ἀγανακτοῦντος δὲ τοῦ θηρευτικοῦ κἀκεῖνον ὀνειδίζοντος, εἴ γε αὐτὸς μὲν καθ' ἑκάστην μοχθεῖ, ἐκεῖνος δὲ μηδὲν πονῶν τοῖς αὐτοῦ τρέφεται πόνοις, [4]ὑπολαβὼν αὐτὸς εἶπε· Μὴ ἐμέ, ἀλλὰ τὸν δεσπότην μέμφου, ὃς οὐ πονεῖν με ἐδίδαξεν, ἀλλὰ πόνους ἀλλοτριους ἐσθίειν.
[E] Ὁ μῦθος δηλοῖ ὅτι καὶ τῶν νέων οἱ μηδὲν ἐπιστάμενοι οὐ μεμπτοί εἰσιν, ὅταν αὐτοὺς οἱ γονεῖς οὕτως ἀγάγωσιν.

 

 

Questions for Chambry 175 Versions 1 and 2 (Reading 9 Primary) (A side-by-side presentation of the two texts is given below the questions)

Q1 Is the phrase τὸν μὲν ἕτερον... τὸν δὲ λοιπὸν an acceptable way of saying 'this one...the other one.? What words would you have chosen?

Q2 The phrase [3] εἴ γε αὐτὸς μὲν καθ' ἑκάστην μοχθεῖ means what? How is εἴ γε used here? Do you have any favorite books or resources for learning the meanings of the various particles in Greek?

Q3 How καθ' ἑκάστην and παρ' ἕκαστα are used in the same sentence. Do they mean the same? What word(s) are implied by each?

Q4 Do you think the phrase ὑπολαβὼν αὐτὸς εἶπε is probably best translated as 'he replied.'; What are some other common ways of saying the same thing?

Q5 Translate the phrase οἱ μηδὲν ἐπιστάμενοι. What lemma is ἐπιστάμενοι from?

Q6 The epimythium of both fables is the same, with the a few twists on words (highlighted with bold text). How would you translate each?

C1 καὶ τῶν παίδων οἱ ῥᾴθυμοι οὐ μεμπτέσι εἰσίν,
C2 καὶ τῶν νέων οἱ μηδὲν ἐπιστάμενοι οὐ μεμπτοί εἰσιν,

C1 ὅταν αὐτοὺς οἱ γονεῖς οὕτως ἄγωσιν.
C2 ὅταν αὐτοὺς οἱ γονεῖς οὕτως ἀγάγωσιν

 

Answers to the questions can be sent directly to Paul Fonck via this link

Chambry published a multivolume edition of the fables for the Belles Lettres series in 1925/6 (Paris). He later revised this into a single volume, omitting hundreds of the fable variants. In addition, the numeration between these two volumes is not consistent. The texts here are taken from the 1925/6 edition, but the numeration follows the standard single volume edition.

 

Comparative Analysis of the two Chambry 175 texts

Line [1]
Ἔχων τις δύο κύνας, τὸν μὲν ἕτερον θηρεύειν ἐδίδαξε,
Ἔχων τις δύο κύνας, τὸν μὲν θηρεύειν ἐδίδασκε,

τὸν δὲ λοιπὸν οἰκοφυλακεῖν.
τὸν δὲ οἰκουρὸν ἐποίησε.

Line [2]
Καὶ δή, εἴ ποτε ὁ θηρευτὴς ἐξιὼν ἐπ' ἄγραν συνελάμβανέ τι,
Καὶ δή, εἴ ποτε ὁ θηρευτικὸς ἤγρευέ τι,

ἐκ τούτου μέρος καὶ τῷ ἑτέρῳ παρέβαλλεν.

καὶ ὁ οἰκουρὸς συμμετεῖχεν αὐτῷ τῆς θοίνης.

Line [3]
Ἀγανακτοῦντος δὲ τοῦ θηρευτικοῦ καὶ τὸν ἕτερον ὀνειδίζοντος,
Ἀγανακτοῦντος δὲ τοῦ θηρευτικοῦ κἀκεῖνον ὀνειδίζοντος,

εἴ γε αὐτὸς μὲν ἐξιὼν παρ' ἕκαστα μοχθεῖ,
εἴ γε αὐτὸς μὲν καθ' ἑκάστην μοχθεῖ,

ὁ δὲ οὐδὲν ποιῶν τοῖς αὐτοῦ πόνοις ἐντρυφᾷ,

ἐκεῖνος δὲ μηδὲν πονῶν τοῖς αὐτοῦ τρέφεται πόνοις,

Line [4]
ἐκεῖνος ἔφη πρὸς αὐτόν·
ὑπολαβὼν αὐτὸς εἶπε·

"Ἀλλὰ μὴ ἐμὲ μέμφου, ἀλλὰ τὸν δεσπότην,
"Μὴ ἐμέ, ἀλλὰ τὸν δεσπότην μέμφου

ὃς οὐ πονεῖν με ἐδίδαξεν, ἀλλὰ πόνους ἀλλοτριους ἐσθίειν."
ὃς οὐ πονεῖν με ἐδίδαξεν, ἀλλοτρίους δὲ πόνους κατεσθίειν."

Epimythium [E]
Οὕτω
Ὁ μῦθος δηλοῖ ὅτι

καὶ τῶν παίδων οἱ ῥᾴθυμοι οὐ μεμπτέσι εἰσίν,
καὶ τῶν νέων οἱ μηδὲν ἐπιστάμενοι οὐ μεμπτοί εἰσιν,

ὅταν αὐτοὺς οἱ γονεῖς οὕτως ἄγωσιν.

ὅταν αὐτοὺς οἱ γονεῖς οὕτως ἀγάγωσιν.


Reading 9 - Optional Reading Babrius 110
Notes
Apparatus
Translation
Answers
Vocabulary

B1
B2
B3
B4

Μέλλων ὁδεύειν τῆς κυνός τις ἑστώσης
εἶπεν "τί χάσκεις; πάνθ' ἕτοιμά σοι ποίει·
μετ' ἐμοῦ γὰρ ἥξεις." ἡ δὲ δεσπότην κέρκῳ
σαίνουσά φησι "πάντ' ἔχω· σὺ δηθύνεις."

Babrius 110 Questions

Q1 How would you describe the construction of line B1?

Q2 The words Μέλλων ὁδεύειν form what Smyth §1959 calls 'a periphrastic future.' What other ways are there to express the idea 'about to do something'?

Q3 What is the idea contained in the words κέρκῳ σαίνουσά? Why the dative? What other meanings did the word σαίνω take on?

Q4 The word δηθύνεις means what? From what root does the word come? Can you list a few cognate words?

Q5 The words πάνθ' ἕτοιμά σοι ποίει and πάντ' ἔχω are the 'joke' and the 'punch line'. Try your hand at translating this short joke.

Answers to the questions can be sent directly to Paul Fonck via this link


 

Reading 9 - Advanced Reading Syntipas 33
Notes
Apparatus
Translation
Answers
Vocabulary

Κύων καὶ μακελλεύς.

[1] Κύων ἐν μακελλίῳ εἰσελθὼν καρδίας βρῶμα ἐκεῖθεν ἀφήρπασεν. [2] ὁ δέ γε μακελλεὺς ἐπιστραφεὶς ἔλεγεν αὐτῷ "οὐ καρδίαν ἥρπασας, ἀλλὰ καρδίαν ἐνέθου μοι· [3] εἰ γὰρ αὖθις ἐνταῦθα εἰσέλθῃς, ἐγώ σοι τὰ τῆς ἁρπαγῆς ἐπιδείξω ἐπίχειρα."
[E] Οὗτος δηλοῖ ὡς ἐν τῷ παθεῖν τις ἐπισπᾶται τὸ μαθεῖν καὶ προσεκτικῶς ἔχειν.

From Ben Perry's Aesopica (Urbana IL: 1952).

Syntipas 33 Questions

Q1 How would you describe the wordτό μάκελλον? To what does it refer here? Why all the variant spellings? (Look up words like μάκελλ)

Q2 The butcher says "οὐ καρδίαν ἥρπασας, ἀλλὰ καρδίαν ἐνέθου μοι·" What is the play on words here? Why does the word play 'work' in Greek?

Q3 The word ἐπίχειρον means what?

Q4 Translate the epimythium.

Q5 The entry in LSJ for echw B.II.2 says that ἔχω is frequently used with adverbs as an idiom meaning 'to be...':

B intransitive II. simply be.
2. freq. with Advbs. of manner, “εὖ ἔχειOd.24.245, etc.; καλῶς ἔχει, κακῶς ἔχει, it is, is going on well or ill, v. καλός, κακός (but fut. σχήσειν καλῶς will turn out well, D.1.9, cf. 18.45; “εὖ σχήσειS.Aj. 684); οὕτως . . σχεῖν to turn out, happen thus, Pl.Ap.39b; οὕτως ἔχει so the case stands, Ar.Pl.110; οὕτως ἐχόντων, Lat. cum res ita se habeant, X.An.3.2.10; “ὡς ὧδ᾽ ἐχόντωνS.Aj.981; “οὕτω χρὴ διὰ στέρνων ἔχεινId.Ant.639; “οὕτως . περί τινοςX.Mem.4.8.7, cf. Hdt.6.16; “πρός τιD. 9.45; “τῇδ᾽ .” S.Ph.1336; “κοσμίως .” Ar.Th.854; “ἥδιον . πρός τιναςD.9.63; ὡς εἶχε just as he was, Hdt.1.114; “ὥσπερ εἶχεTh.1.134, X. HG4.1.30; ὡς ἔχω how I am, Ar.Lys.610; “ὥσπερ ἔχομενTh.3.30; “τἀναντία εἶχενD.9.41; ἀσφαλέως, ἀναγκαίως ἔχει, = ἀσφαλές, ἀναγκαῖόν ἐστι, Hdt.1.86,9.27; καλῶς ἔχει no, I thank you, v. καλός.

Is that the way the word ἔχω is used here? Is there another meaning usage of ἔχω that you think would better apply here?

Answers to the questions can be sent directly to Paul Fonck via this link

 


Line Numbering and the Structure of Fables

The lines are numbered for collation and reference purposes. The line numbering format is comprised of three elements: Author+Version+Line Identifier: Author = B/C#.1/C#.2/S/A/H for Babrius, Chambry 1, Chambry 2, Syntipas,  Aphthonius or Herodotus; Line Identifier = T/M/#  where  T=Title, P = Promythium, E = Epimythium or  # = Line number (incremental, but not counting the moral or title); The endomythium, the moral 'inside the story, is simply listed as a line number.

Parts of a fable:
Promythium: A moral that comes before the story, so that the reader / listener can properly decode the meaning
Fable Body: the content of the fable, including the endomythium, but not the promythium or epimythiu.
Endomythium: the moral inside the story (listed as a line number)
Epimythium: The moral added at the end of the story to make sure the point of the fable is clear.


 

Additional Tools and Aids to Reading

The LetsReadGreek website has vocabulary and a list of helpful questions and leads on some of the more difficult words.  A little of topical vocabulary for each is included, along with a Latin version, some English versions of the fables and some engravings and carvings from older books.  The LetsReadGreek site requires one to have a unicode Greek compatible font. I've been trying to get the site properly configured, so please be patient.  A note, SPIonic is not adequate, you must have one of the Windows or Mac unicode fonts installed.  Gentium is a wonderful and easy to read font downloadable from the SIL website at http://scripts.sil.org/Gentium_download.

I highly recommend using the Perseus website tools for vocabulary, morphology, texts and grammar.  There is a lot there; however, Aesop is not.  Some of the vocabulary in the fables do not exist in LSJ (but maybe in the supplement).  To use Perseus adequately, one must learn Perseus’ betacode style with variations, for questions see the FAQ.  I also suggest bookmarking the base pages in your browser, or better yet, drag them if you can and put each one onto your browser’s toolbar.   The following online tools can be found on the Perseus website:

Note: If you are using the Perseus site, you must set your Perseus configuration to properly display the Greek. This may be done by clicking on the "Configure Display" on the Perseus Menu and selecting the corresponding Greek format (choose Unicode or Unicode with pre-combined accents).

 

Steinhowel's Aesop: Illustrations

(Steinhowel 1479) 122. De duobus canibus.

SteinHowel2Dogs2

(Steinhowel 1501) Click on the image to see the entire page.

SteinHowel2Dogs1

(Steinhowel - in Spanish, 1521)

SteinHowel2Dogs3


Illustrations from the 1479 edition of Steinhowel come from the online edition at the Library of Congress. This edition is in German, not Latin, so I have reproduced only the images here. The illustrations for the 1501 edition of Steinhowel are online at the University of Mannheim. So that you can see the Latin text on these pages, each 1501 image is linked to a full page view of this edition (although the images are poor quality gif images, unlike the high-quality images at Library of Congress). Finally, I have included a 1521 edition of Steinhowel translated into Spanish, also from the Library of Congress. As you can see, the illustrations continue to follow the same basic pattern but have a decidedly different element of style.

 


 

Vernon Jones (1912)

94. THE DOG AND THE SHADOW

A Dog was crossing a plank bridge over a stream with a piece of meat in his mouth, when he happened to see his own reflection in the water. He thought it was another dog with a piece of meat twice as big; so he let go his own, and flew at the other dog to get the larger piece. But, of course, all that happened was that he got neither; for one was only a shadow, and the other was carried away by the current.

THE DOG AND THE SHADOW


Aesop's Fables: A New Translation by V.S. Vernon Jones with illustrations by Arthur Rackham (1912). This book is available online at Project Gutenberg.

 

THE DOG AND HIS REFLECTION


Aesop for Children (translator not identified), 1919. Illustrations by Milo Winter (1886-1956). Available online at Project Gutenberg.

(Steinhowel 1479) 5. De cane et carne.

SteinHowel2

(Steinhowel 1501) Click on the image to see the entire page.

SteinHowel1

(Steinhowel - in Spanish, 1521)

SteinHowel3


Illustrations from the 1479 edition of Steinhowel come from the online edition at the Library of Congress. This edition is in German, not Latin, so I have reproduced only the images here. The illustrations for the 1501 edition of Steinhowel are online at the University of Mannheim. So that you can see the Latin text on these pages, each 1501 image is linked to a full page view of this edition (although the images are poor quality gif images, unlike the high-quality images at Library of Congress). Finally, I have included a 1521 edition of Steinhowel translated into Spanish, also from the Library of Congress. As you can see, the illustrations continue to follow the same basic pattern but have a decidedly different element of style.


 

Ovis


Phryx Aesopus Habitu Poetico, by Hieronymus Osius, 1574 (artist not identified). Available online at the University of Mannheim. This book clearly recycles a set of images from another book of Aesop's fables. In some cases, the illustration does not match the fable shown, and in some cases I have not been able to identify what fable a given illustration is supposed to illustrate

Aristophanes Wasps
A Dog Indictment

PHILOCLEON
Who is the defendant?
BDELYCLEON
This one.
PHILOCLEON (aside)
He does not stand a chance.
BDELYCLEON
Listen to the indictment. A dog of Cydathenaea doth hereby
charge Labes of Aexonia with having devoured a Sicilian cheese by
himself without accomplices. Penalty demanded, a collar of fig-tree
wood.
PHILOCLEON
Nay, a dog's death, if convicted.
BDELYCLEON
This is Labes, the defendant.
PHILOCLEON
Oh! what a wretched brute! how entirely he looks the rogue! He
thinks to deceive me by keeping his jaws closed. Where is the
plaintiff, the dog of Cydathenaea?
DOG
Bow wow! bow wow!
BDELYCLEON
Here he is.
PHILOCLEON
Why, he's another Labes, a great barker and a licker of dishes.
BDELYCLEON (as Herald)
Silence! Keep your seats! (To the Cydathenaean dog.) And you, up
on your feet and accuse him.
PHILOCLEON
Go on, and I will help myself and eat these lentils.
DOG
Gentlemen of the jury, listen to this indictment I have drawn
up. He has committed the blackest of crimes, against both me and the
seamen. He sought refuge in a dark corner to glutton on a big Sicilian
cheese, with which he sated his hunger.
PHILOCLEON
Why, the crime is clear; the filthy brute this very moment belched
forth a horrible odour of cheese right under my nose.
DOG
And he refused to share with me. And yet can anyone style
himself your benefactor, when he does not cast a morsel to your poor
dog?
PHILOCLEON
He has not shared anything, not even with his comrade. His madness
is as hot as my lentils.
BDELYCLEON
In the name of the gods, father! No hurried verdict without
hearing the other side!
PHILOCLEON
But the evidence is plain; the fact speaks for itself.
DOG
Then beware of acquitting the most selfish of canine gluttons, who
has devoured the whole cheese, rind and all, prowling round the
platter.
PHILOCLEON
There is not even enough left for me to fill up the chinks in my
pitcher.
DOG
Besides, you must punish him, because the same house cannot keep
two thieves. Let me not have barked in vain, else I shall never bark
again.
PHILOCLEON
Oh! the black deeds he has just denounced! What a shameless thief!
Say, cock, is not that your opinion too? Ha, ha! He thinks as I do.
Here, Thesmothetes! where are you? Hand me the thunder-mug.
BDELYCLEON
Get it yourself. I go to call the witnesses; these are a plate,
a pestle, a cheese knife, a brazier, a stew-pot and other half-burnt
utensils. (To PHILOCLEON) But you have not finished? you are
piddling away still! Have done and be seated.
PHILOCLEON
Ha, ha! I reckon I know somebody who will crap for fright to-day.
BDELYCLEON
Will you never cease showing yourself hard and intractable, and
especially to the accused? You tear them to pieces tooth and nail. (To
LABES)
Come forward and defend yourself. What means this silence?
Answer.
PHILOCLEON
No doubt he has nothing to say.
BDELYCLEON
Not at all, I think he has got what happened once to Thucydides in
court; his jaws suddenly set fast. Get away! I will undertake your
defence.-Gentlemen of the jury, it is a difficult thing to speak for a
dog who has been calumniated, but nevertheless I will try. He is a
good dog, and he chases wolves finely.
PHILOCLEON
He is a thief and a conspirator.
BDELYCLEON
No, he is the best of all our dogs; he is capable of guarding a
whole flock.
PHILOCLEON
And what good is that, if he eats the cheese?
BDELYCLEON
What? he fights for you, he guards your door; he is an excellent
dog in every respect. Forgive him his larceny! he is wretchedly
ignorant, he cannot play the lyre.
PHILOCLEON
I wish he did not know how to write either; then the rascal
would not have drawn up his pleadings.
BDELYCLEON
Witnesses, I pray you, listen. Come forward, grating-knife, and
speak up; answer me clearly. You were paymaster at the time. Did you
grate out to the soldiers what was given you?-He says he did so.
PHILOCLEON
But, by Zeus! he lies.
BDELYCLEON
Oh! have patience. Take pity on the unfortunate. Labes feeds
only on fish-bones and fishes' heads and has not an instant of
peace. The other is good only to guard the house; he never moves
from here, but demands his share of all that is brought in and bites
those who refuse.
PHILOCLEON (aside)
Oh! Heaven! have I fallen ill? I feel my anger cooling! Woe to me!
I am softening!
BDELYCLEON
Have pity, father, pity, I adjure you; you would not have him
dead. Where are his puppies? (A group of children costumed as
puppies comes out.)
Come, poor little beasties, yap, up on your
haunches, beg and whine!

 

beats by dre green Monday 2014 Hollister green monday uggs green Monday uggs super saturday deals michael kors green monday deals north face green monday uggs super saturday uggs green Monday beats by dre green Monday 2014 ugg boots super saturday moncler green Monday sale canada goose green Monday north face green monday 2014 uggs super saturday deals kate spade green Monday sales north face green Monday Hollister green Monday 2014 moncler green Monday 2014 uggs super Saturday deals uggs super saturday north face super Saturday uggs green Monday canada goose green monday burberry green monday north face green monday 2014 ugg super saturday canada goose green monday michael kors green Monday deals uggs green monday north face super Saturday beats by dre green Monday 2014 uggs green monday michael kors green Monday lululemon green Monday Hollister green Monday the north face super saturday Hollister green Monday uggs super Saturday uggs green monday sale michael kors green Monday